2018 Diversity Summit Event Schedule

7:00am Registration & Continental Conference Breakfast
8:45am Shine Children's Chorus
9:00am Welcome Remarks | Oregon Ballroom
9:15am Morning Keynote: Shiza Shahid | Founding GP, NOW Ventures | Oregon Ballroom Shiza Shahid and Malala Yousafzai-two young women, less than a decade apart in age-grew up in different Pakistani villages at a time when terrorism was on the rise. Malala captured the world's attention when the Taliban attempted to assassinate her in 2012 because of her work- in defiance of the Taliban-on behalf of girls' rights to an education. Shahid is the former CEO and co-founder of the Malala Fund. She is working with Malala to make formal education available to the more than 600 million adolescent girls around the world who are denied that opportunity because of social, economic, legal and political impediments. Ms. Shahid will share the inspiring story of how she came to know and work with young Malala Yousafzai, who would later be shot by the Taliban advocating for education. Shahid discovered through her volunteer work as a young girl, that "you have the power to change what you cannot accept, whether in your own life or the life of the world around you." She will urge attendees to live a life of passion for the greater good of all peoples and the social and economic development through all peoples.
10:15am Break
10:45am Breakout Seminars 1
It is a widely held belief, backed by overwhelming evidence, that top female talent is a key driver when it comes to competitive advantage, however gender diversity in all levels of employment continues to be a struggle. It is essential that companies create programs and policies which support their female workforce; when women thrive, business will thrive.

Shiza Shahid | Founding GP, NOW Ventures
We are living in a world of almost unparalleled separation. After the most contentious election in American history, the country stands torn between two polarized views of the world that are so rooted in fundamental differences that some have compared the situation to the Sunni/Shia divide in Islam. People are no longer disagreeing but instead are disavowing each other's right to an opinion. Throughout the Western world, this same mindset creates an unceasing flow of arguments and a gap that widens into greater and greater divergence all the time. The tension extends to our most fundamental relationships. Thousands of families, for example, have canceled their last two Thanksgiving dinners because of the fear of confronting political divide. Businesses find it more and more difficult to avoid the tension that all of these dualities create in the workplace on a daily basis. Schools have seen a surge in bullying, with some children returning home with the message from teachers and peers that their families will be deported. The purpose of this session (based on the early research and writing of a new book by the same title that will be published by Berrett-Koehler in April 2018) will be to explore the seemingly paradoxical manner in which our compulsion to connect with other human beings often creates greater polarity in our culture and organizations, leaving us deeply connected with some, yet deeply divided from others. The session will look at the recently discovered neuro-cognitive science behind our primary need to belong, explore how it motivates human behavior and investigate how it shows up in our daily lives. Finally, we will explore ways that have been found to bridge the divide in order to create greater harmony and cooperation in our personal, organizational and civic lives.

Howard Ross | Founding Partner, Cook Ross, Inc.  
Racial microaggressions are brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color. Perpetrators of microaggressions are often unaware that they engage in such communications when they interact with racial/ethnic minorities. A taxonomy of racial microaggressions in everyday life was created through a review of the social psychological literature on aversive racism, from formulations regarding the manifestation and impact of everyday racism, and from reading numerous personal narratives of counselors (both White and those of color) on their racial/cultural awakening. Microaggressions seem to appear in three forms: microassault, microinsult, and microinvalidation. Almost all interracial encounters are prone to microaggressions; this workshop seminar will use conversational and management to employee dyads to illustrate how they impair the development of a inclusion and high performance alliance. Suggestions regarding education and training and research in the helping professions are discussed as well.

Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D. | Professor of Psychology and Education, Columbia University
Said plainly, this is different than any D&I training you've heard. D&I has a deep, root issue; essentially, inclusion goes against human nature. Nature's default culture is exclusion. D&I is not a behavior problem, it's in hearts and minds. Therefore, an emphasis on 'best practices' will never bring about sustained change. A meta-awareness of the organization's actualized culture is the absolute starting point. Trying to manage inclusion change without this next-level (meta) awareness is costly, slow, and will not bring about desired results. The further this recognition spreads throughout the organization, the more easily the issue of exclusion is exposed, the more readily a culture of inclusion can be introduced and adopted. The trick, is doing this without adding fuel to the exclusion fire; many attempts (even best practices) increase division. Other attempts dilute the value of the inclusion initiative by making it a performance metric; as if human worth is just another KPI. This session will divide the tension between best practices and a truly inclusive culture. It does so with a language, perspective, and intentionality which makes D&I mindfulness engaging, and professionally and personally valuable. There is a healthy dose of hope and motivation in this training. There is no shortage of meat and potatoes, complimented with amazing cupcakes and a cold glass of milk to wash it down. Come learn how to have your heart and mind improved and how to help others do the same.

Dan Friess | Inclusion Strategist, Incight
The return on investment of diversity and inclusion efforts can be very challenging to measure. It is not always obvious what results should be measured, and even if you know what to measure, it is often not clear how the measurement process should be conducted. Not everything can be easily measured with numbers, thus the diversity practitioner may give up when faced with measuring something like "creativity" or "diverse work team productivity" or "innovation". In this session, Dr. Ed Hubbard will provide a road map for this difficult measurement task, explaining ways to acquire and create performance standards for diversity, and how to diversity goals to the goals and objectives of the organization.

Edward Hubbard, Ph.D. | President and CEO, Hubbard & Hubbard, Inc.
There is a "Great Generational Shift" underway in the workforce today. This is the post-Baby Boomer transition that demographers and workforce planners have been anticipating for decades. And it's not only a generational shift in the numbers in the workforce. This is also an epic turning point in the norms and values of the workforce, and a corresponding transformation in the very fundamentals of the employer-employee relationship. This "Great Generational Shift" presents a whole new set of challenges for employers in every industry, employees of all ages, and for managers at every level. What does the generation mix look like in your organization? And what does it mean for the future of your organization? Understand the diversity of generations in the workplace today - each at different life stages, each with conflicting perspectives, expectations, and needs.

Bruce Tulgan | Founder and CEO, RainmakerThinking, Inc.  
Racism is a system of advantage that is based on race. In large part, racism stems from the human brain's tendency to engage in prejudice, a process that allows our brains to make judgments based on visual or other sensory information in milliseconds. These preconceived opinions about other people are not based on reason or experience. But why does the brain do this? More importantly, can we use what we known about the neuroscience of prejudice to overcome this reaction, potentially developing methods to combat prejudice and end racism? This presentation focuses on neuroscience research demonstrating how our brains react to people that we perceive as "different", on the physiological effects of racism that are regulated by our brains, and on strategies to overcome the automatic prejudice that contributes to racism in our society.

Learning Objectives
- Understand the effects of prejudice on human health and its cost to society
- Understand the underlying mechanisms by which the brain engages in prejudice
- Understand behavioral strategies that can help overcome prejudice and racism

Larry Sherman, Ph.D. | Professor of Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University
The unfortunate US history of racism as well as the current problematic racial disparities across every sector of society point to a truth... Race Matters! Still, many corporate policy, programming and practice guidelines fail to align with this reality. When leaders in corporations develop deeper understanding of the omnipresent impact of race on their workforce composition, marketplace of consumers, product appeal and overall brand perception, and effectively act on their newfound understandings, lasting change begins. Increasing racial diversity is not merely a statistical exercise or response to external pressures, rather, it is grounded in intentional efforts to create and sustain a culture and climate in which all employees, especially traditionally marginalized Black, Brown and Indigenous employees, discover and produce through their most empowered selves.

Glenn E. Singleton | President and Founder, Courageous Conversation  
Engage in a conversation that focuses on how a number of businesses are advancing equity, diversity, and inclusion with the exploration of cultural and institutional racism at the core. The discussion will include a focus on: redefining markets with changing demographics, how meaningful efforts to advance equity, diversity, and inclusion in business benefits everyone, and what it means to stay "neutral" in today's climate.

Hanif Fazal| Founder and CEO, Center for Equity and Inclusion
Although census data show Oregon's population becoming more racially diverse, the perception persists that we are one of the whitest states in the nation. Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another. Oregon's history as a whitetopia of exclusion, exploitation, and violence against people of color has shaped a specific set of challenges for our communities today, particularly if we are to fulfill the vision of a racially equitable society. This workshop will: (1) Introduce a systemic framework to understand how racism operates today, in a post-Civil Rights era; (2) Explore the challenges that emerge as a result of white supremacy being institutionalized in society and our work [sector, institution]; (3) Consider how Oregonians perpetuate the problem of racism (the excuses we make); and (4) Explore some promising practices for interrupting inequality.

Dr. Emily Drew | Associate Professor of Sociology and Ethnic Studies, Willamette University
Objectives:
Participants will be able to
-examine three variables that research shows mitigate bias and prejudice
-identify the joint vision of intercultural competence and diversity & inclusion
-review the forces compelling building a bridge between culture and diversity & inclusion


What is the key to transforming bias and prejudice? How can you put these variables to work for you? Can you integrate culture and diversity into your initiatives? What forces stand in the way? And what compels us to try anyway? We will review a bit of research that points to some approaches that support success and engage your participation in the process.

Dr. Janet Bennett | Executive Director, Intercultural Communication Institute
For decades, nonprofit organizations have included a shining model that that has been generating outstanding results for the youth and families of color who use their services. Called "culturally specific organizations," both governments and local foundations have been increasing their support for their service and policy roles. The workshop shares new research findings on how they obtain supersized results, as well as insights from three leading equity advocates and practitioners on how the business sector can use this learning. By centering race and culture, business strategies hold potential to increase market share, innovate in their field, recruit and retain diverse talent, and more. Join this session to explore innovation in advancing your organization's core goals.

Ann Curry-Stevens | Founding Director, Center to Advance Racial Equity, Portland State University
Keith Thomajan | CEO, United Way
Tony Hopson | CEO, Self-Enhancement, Inc.
11:45am Break
12:00pm Lunch & Luncheon Programming | Oregon Ballroom
Equity Report
Ann Curry-Stevens | Founding Director, Center to Advance Racial Equity, Portland State University  
1:00pm Afternoon Keynote: Steve Robbins | Founder, S.L. Robbins & Associates | Oregon Ballroom "Your Brain is Good at Inclusion... Except When It's Not" This presentation provides an innovative, science-based look at the benefits of creating inclusive workplaces. Using the fields of cognitive neuroscience, socio-psychology, and communication (among others), Dr. Robbins explores with his audience the human, hard-wired need to be valued and included - and what happens when that need is not met. He demonstrates how our brain has natural tendencies (i.e. biases) that can help us achieve goals, but also lead to unintended consequences, like the exclusion of others who are different than us. He provides listeners with terms and a language that invite people into productive conversations about inclusion and diversity. In the end, Dr. Robbins shows that the key to battling bias in organizations begins with understanding how individuals' brains operate, but ultimately requires changes in organizational patterns of beliefs and behaviors. The presentation makes a compelling, neuroscience-grounded case for why addressing inclusion and diversity is not an option, but an organizational imperative for excelling in a dynamic, 21st century world. And as always, Dr. Robbins brings all this science-based content neatly packaged in real-world relevance, a good dose of storytelling and laugh-out-loud humor. Ultimately, listeners will walk away with 1) a greater motivation to engage the work of inclusion and diversity, 2) better understand what that work looks like, and 3) how such work will enhance individual and organizational performance.

2:00pm Break
2:30pm Breakout Seminars 2
Dr. Robbins will expand on his keynote presentation, offering a deeper dive into the science of D&I. This session will help participants:
- Better understand the work of inclusion and diversity from the perspectives of human behavior and cognitive neuroscience
- Understand how the brain's natural functioning can lead to unintended consequences and prevent us from leveraging human differences
- Better understand the root of cause(s) of inclusion and diversity-related problems
- Obtain concepts, terms and language that invite people into conversation about inclusion and diversity
- Walk away with a deeper commitment and simple, yet powerful actions to address issues of inclusion and diversity

Steve Robbins | Founder, S.L. Robbins & Associates
Over the past ten years the study of unconscious bias has exploded into the diversity and inclusion field, built on breakthroughs in the neurocognitive sciences and hundreds of new studies that provide insight into how we think and how that thinking shapes our workplace behavior. However, these insights are often being misunderstood and misused in a way that actually perpetuates some of the challenges that organizations face. This workshop will reveal new research on these very factors that calls diversity practitioners to rethink some of the strategies that we have become all too comfortable with in order to allow greater collaboration by all people in the development of inclusion, and truly transform the way we work with organizational diversity, cultural competency, dimensions of power, and inclusion on both a personal and organizational level. By recognizing that we all have biases, and that they serve an important role in helping us manage our lives, we can begin the journey toward self-discovery that is at the heart of inclusion. However, organizational systems and structures have to also be created in order to create sustainable inclusion.

Howard Ross | Founding Partner, Cook Ross, Inc.  
Racial microaggressions are brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color. Perpetrators of microaggressions are often unaware that they engage in such communications when they interact with racial/ethnic minorities. A taxonomy of racial microaggressions in everyday life was created through a review of the social psychological literature on aversive racism, from formulations regarding the manifestation and impact of everyday racism, and from reading numerous personal narratives of counselors (both White and those of color) on their racial/cultural awakening. Microaggressions seem to appear in three forms: microassault, microinsult, and microinvalidation. Almost all interracial encounters are prone to microaggressions; this workshop seminar will use conversational and management to employee dyads to illustrate how they impair the development of a inclusion and high performance alliance. Suggestions regarding education and training and research in the helping professions are discussed as well.

Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D. | Professor of Psychology and Education, Columbia University
Said plainly, this is different than any D&I training you've heard. D&I has a deep, root issue; essentially, inclusion goes against human nature. Nature's default culture is exclusion. D&I is not a behavior problem, it's in hearts and minds. Therefore, an emphasis on 'best practices' will never bring about sustained change. A meta-awareness of the organization's actualized culture is the absolute starting point. Trying to manage inclusion change without this next-level (meta) awareness is costly, slow, and will not bring about desired results. The further this recognition spreads throughout the organization, the more easily the issue of exclusion is exposed, the more readily a culture of inclusion can be introduced and adopted. The trick, is doing this without adding fuel to the exclusion fire; many attempts (even best practices) increase division. Other attempts dilute the value of the inclusion initiative by making it a performance metric; as if human worth is just another KPI. This session will divide the tension between best practices and a truly inclusive culture. It does so with a language, perspective, and intentionality which makes D&I mindfulness engaging, and professionally and personally valuable. There is a healthy dose of hope and motivation in this training. There is no shortage of meat and potatoes, complimented with amazing cupcakes and a cold glass of milk to wash it down. Come learn how to have your heart and mind improved and how to help others do the same.

Dan Friess | Inclusion Strategist, Incight
The return on investment of diversity and inclusion efforts can be very challenging to measure. It is not always obvious what results should be measured, and even if you know what to measure, it is often not clear how the measurement process should be conducted. Not everything can be easily measured with numbers, thus the diversity practitioner may give up when faced with measuring something like "creativity" or "diverse work team productivity" or "innovation". In this session, Dr. Ed Hubbard will provide a road map for this difficult measurement task, explaining ways to acquire and create performance standards for diversity, and how to diversity goals to the goals and objectives of the organization.

Edward Hubbard, Ph.D. | President and CEO, Hubbard & Hubbard, Inc.
There is a "Great Generational Shift" underway in the workforce today. This is the post-Baby Boomer transition that demographers and workforce planners have been anticipating for decades. And it's not only a generational shift in the numbers in the workforce. This is also an epic turning point in the norms and values of the workforce, and a corresponding transformation in the very fundamentals of the employer-employee relationship. This "Great Generational Shift" presents a whole new set of challenges for employers in every industry, employees of all ages, and for managers at every level. What does the generation mix look like in your organization? And what does it mean for the future of your organization? Understand the diversity of generations in the workplace today - each at different life stages, each with conflicting perspectives, expectations, and needs.

Bruce Tulgan | Founder and CEO, RainmakerThinking, Inc.  
Racism is a system of advantage that is based on race. In large part, racism stems from the human brain's tendency to engage in prejudice, a process that allows our brains to make judgments based on visual or other sensory information in milliseconds. These preconceived opinions about other people are not based on reason or experience. But why does the brain do this? More importantly, can we use what we known about the neuroscience of prejudice to overcome this reaction, potentially developing methods to combat prejudice and end racism? This presentation focuses on neuroscience research demonstrating how our brains react to people that we perceive as "different", on the physiological effects of racism that are regulated by our brains, and on strategies to overcome the automatic prejudice that contributes to racism in our society.

Learning Objectives
- Understand the effects of prejudice on human health and its cost to society
- Understand the underlying mechanisms by which the brain engages in prejudice
- Understand behavioral strategies that can help overcome prejudice and racism

Larry Sherman, Ph.D. | Professor of Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University
It is a widely held belief, backed by overwhelming evidence, that top female talent is a key driver when it comes to competitive advantage, however gender diversity in all levels of employment continues to be a struggle. It is essential that companies create programs and policies which support their female workforce; when women thrive, business will thrive.

Shiza Shahid | Founding GP, NOW Ventures
Engage in a conversation that focuses on how a number of businesses are advancing equity, diversity, and inclusion with the exploration of cultural and institutional racism at the core. The discussion will include a focus on: redefining markets with changing demographics, how meaningful efforts to advance equity, diversity, and inclusion in business benefits everyone, and what it means to stay "neutral" in today's climate.

Hanif Fazal| Founder and CEO, Center for Equity and Inclusion
Although census data show Oregon's population becoming more racially diverse, the perception persists that we are one of the whitest states in the nation. Many Oregonians value racial diversity and the dimension and depth it adds to our lives, yet we remain largely isolated from one another. Oregon's history as a whitetopia of exclusion, exploitation, and violence against people of color has shaped a specific set of challenges for our communities today, particularly if we are to fulfill the vision of a racially equitable society. This workshop will: (1) Introduce a systemic framework to understand how racism operates today, in a post-Civil Rights era; (2) Explore the challenges that emerge as a result of white supremacy being institutionalized in society and our work [sector, institution]; (3) Consider how Oregonians perpetuate the problem of racism (the excuses we make); and (4) Explore some promising practices for interrupting inequality.

Dr. Emily Drew | Associate Professor of Sociology and Ethnic Studies, Willamette University
In this session participants will explore the dynamics of what it will take to position diversity and inclusion as a breakthrough strategy to forward progress in their organizations. They will learn how to position themselves as leaders no matter where they are on the organizational chart. We will explore:
- Leaders you admire and what attributes they display
- How to see yourself as someone who can lead diversity and inclusion functions in your place of work
- Challenges you may encounter doing both your regular job and tending to diversity and inclusion activities
- Successes and barriers other organizations have faced and how they addressed them

Steve Hanamura | President, Hanamura Consulting, Inc.
The unfortunate US history of racism as well as the current problematic racial disparities across every sector of society point to a truth... Race Matters! Still, many corporate policy, programming and practice guidelines fail to align with this reality. When leaders in corporations develop deeper understanding of the omnipresent impact of race on their workforce composition, marketplace of consumers, product appeal and overall brand perception, and effectively act on their newfound understandings, lasting change begins. Increasing racial diversity is not merely a statistical exercise or response to external pressures, rather, it is grounded in intentional efforts to create and sustain a culture and climate in which all employees, especially traditionally marginalized Black, Brown and Indigenous employees, discover and produce through their most empowered selves.

Glenn E. Singleton | President and Founder, Courageous Conversation  
3:30pm Break
3:50pm Breakout Seminars 3
Dr. Robbins will expand on his keynote presentation, offering a deeper dive into the science of D&I. This session will help participants:
- Better understand the work of inclusion and diversity from the perspectives of human behavior and cognitive neuroscience
- Understand how the brain's natural functioning can lead to unintended consequences and prevent us from leveraging human differences
- Better understand the root of cause(s) of inclusion and diversity-related problems
- Obtain concepts, terms and language that invite people into conversation about inclusion and diversity
- Walk away with a deeper commitment and simple, yet powerful actions to address issues of inclusion and diversity

Steve Robbins | Founder, S.L. Robbins & Associates
Over the past ten years the study of unconscious bias has exploded into the diversity and inclusion field, built on breakthroughs in the neurocognitive sciences and hundreds of new studies that provide insight into how we think and how that thinking shapes our workplace behavior. However, these insights are often being misunderstood and misused in a way that actually perpetuates some of the challenges that organizations face. This workshop will reveal new research on these very factors that calls diversity practitioners to rethink some of the strategies that we have become all too comfortable with in order to allow greater collaboration by all people in the development of inclusion, and truly transform the way we work with organizational diversity, cultural competency, dimensions of power, and inclusion on both a personal and organizational level. By recognizing that we all have biases, and that they serve an important role in helping us manage our lives, we can begin the journey toward self-discovery that is at the heart of inclusion. However, organizational systems and structures have to also be created in order to create sustainable inclusion.

Howard Ross | Founding Partner, Cook Ross, Inc.  
Racial microaggressions are brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color. Perpetrators of microaggressions are often unaware that they engage in such communications when they interact with racial/ethnic minorities. A taxonomy of racial microaggressions in everyday life was created through a review of the social psychological literature on aversive racism, from formulations regarding the manifestation and impact of everyday racism, and from reading numerous personal narratives of counselors (both White and those of color) on their racial/cultural awakening. Microaggressions seem to appear in three forms: microassault, microinsult, and microinvalidation. Almost all interracial encounters are prone to microaggressions; this workshop seminar will use conversational and management to employee dyads to illustrate how they impair the development of a inclusion and high performance alliance. Suggestions regarding education and training and research in the helping professions are discussed as well.

Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D. | Professor of Psychology and Education, Columbia University
Said plainly, this is different than any D&I training you've heard. D&I has a deep, root issue; essentially, inclusion goes against human nature. Nature's default culture is exclusion. D&I is not a behavior problem, it's in hearts and minds. Therefore, an emphasis on 'best practices' will never bring about sustained change. A meta-awareness of the organization's actualized culture is the absolute starting point. Trying to manage inclusion change without this next-level (meta) awareness is costly, slow, and will not bring about desired results. The further this recognition spreads throughout the organization, the more easily the issue of exclusion is exposed, the more readily a culture of inclusion can be introduced and adopted. The trick, is doing this without adding fuel to the exclusion fire; many attempts (even best practices) increase division. Other attempts dilute the value of the inclusion initiative by making it a performance metric; as if human worth is just another KPI. This session will divide the tension between best practices and a truly inclusive culture. It does so with a language, perspective, and intentionality which makes D&I mindfulness engaging, and professionally and personally valuable. There is a healthy dose of hope and motivation in this training. There is no shortage of meat and potatoes, complimented with amazing cupcakes and a cold glass of milk to wash it down. Come learn how to have your heart and mind improved and how to help others do the same.

Dan Friess | Inclusion Strategist, Incight
The return on investment of diversity and inclusion efforts can be very challenging to measure. It is not always obvious what results should be measured, and even if you know what to measure, it is often not clear how the measurement process should be conducted. Not everything can be easily measured with numbers, thus the diversity practitioner may give up when faced with measuring something like "creativity" or "diverse work team productivity" or "innovation". In this session, Dr. Ed Hubbard will provide a road map for this difficult measurement task, explaining ways to acquire and create performance standards for diversity, and how to diversity goals to the goals and objectives of the organization.

Edward Hubbard, Ph.D. | President and CEO, Hubbard & Hubbard, Inc.
There is a "Great Generational Shift" underway in the workforce today. This is the post-Baby Boomer transition that demographers and workforce planners have been anticipating for decades. And it's not only a generational shift in the numbers in the workforce. This is also an epic turning point in the norms and values of the workforce, and a corresponding transformation in the very fundamentals of the employer-employee relationship. This "Great Generational Shift" presents a whole new set of challenges for employers in every industry, employees of all ages, and for managers at every level. What does the generation mix look like in your organization? And what does it mean for the future of your organization? Understand the diversity of generations in the workplace today - each at different life stages, each with conflicting perspectives, expectations, and needs.

Bruce Tulgan | Founder and CEO, RainmakerThinking, Inc.  
Racism is a system of advantage that is based on race. In large part, racism stems from the human brain's tendency to engage in prejudice, a process that allows our brains to make judgments based on visual or other sensory information in milliseconds. These preconceived opinions about other people are not based on reason or experience. But why does the brain do this? More importantly, can we use what we known about the neuroscience of prejudice to overcome this reaction, potentially developing methods to combat prejudice and end racism? This presentation focuses on neuroscience research demonstrating how our brains react to people that we perceive as "different", on the physiological effects of racism that are regulated by our brains, and on strategies to overcome the automatic prejudice that contributes to racism in our society.

Learning Objectives
- Understand the effects of prejudice on human health and its cost to society
- Understand the underlying mechanisms by which the brain engages in prejudice
- Understand behavioral strategies that can help overcome prejudice and racism

Larry Sherman, Ph.D. | Professor of Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University
The unfortunate US history of racism as well as the current problematic racial disparities across every sector of society point to a truth... Race Matters! Still, many corporate policy, programming and practice guidelines fail to align with this reality. When leaders in corporations develop deeper understanding of the omnipresent impact of race on their workforce composition, marketplace of consumers, product appeal and overall brand perception, and effectively act on their newfound understandings, lasting change begins. Increasing racial diversity is not merely a statistical exercise or response to external pressures, rather, it is grounded in intentional efforts to create and sustain a culture and climate in which all employees, especially traditionally marginalized Black, Brown and Indigenous employees, discover and produce through their most empowered selves.

Glenn E. Singleton | President and Founder, Courageous Conversation  
Engage in a conversation that focuses on how a number of businesses are advancing equity, diversity, and inclusion with the exploration of cultural and institutional racism at the core. The discussion will include a focus on: redefining markets with changing demographics, how meaningful efforts to advance equity, diversity, and inclusion in business benefits everyone, and what it means to stay "neutral" in today's climate.

Hanif Fazal| Founder and CEO, Center for Equity and Inclusion
Solving diversity challenges strategically at the organizational level can be dauntingly difficult and slow. How does an organization systematically plan, implement, measure, and sustain its equity and inclusion strategies long term? How do they institutionalize these strategies for maximum long-term impact? What's at stake if they don't?

In this one-hour presentation, Marc Smiley and Lillian A. Tsai will lead the audience through the "Four Dimensions of Sustainable Impact," a holistic planning and implementation model focused on the intersections of strategy, leadership, culture, and brand.

- Learn how these four areas intersect organically and how to uncover problems that may be the underlying symptoms of inequities and exclusion.
- We will provide you with a list of strategic and tactical questions to help you systemically plan how to ask the "tough questions" as you operationalize diversity, equity and inclusion.
- Walk away with new ideas about how you, as a leader (manager, DEI advocate), can take responsibility, establish accountability, gain information and insights on how to use the Four Dimensions to institutionalize culture change at your organization.

Marc Smiley | Principal, Solid Ground Consulting
Lillian Tsai | Lead Equity and Inclusion Consultant, Solid Ground Consulting
For decades, nonprofit organizations have included a shining model that that has been generating outstanding results for the youth and families of color who use their services. Called "culturally specific organizations," both governments and local foundations have been increasing their support for their service and policy roles. The workshop shares new research findings on how they obtain supersized results, as well as insights from three leading equity advocates and practitioners on how the business sector can use this learning. By centering race and culture, business strategies hold potential to increase market share, innovate in their field, recruit and retain diverse talent, and more. Join this session to explore innovation in advancing your organization's core goals.

Ann Curry-Stevens | Founding Director, Center to Advance Racial Equity, Portland State University
Keith Thomajan | CEO, United Way
Tony Hopson | CEO, Self-Enhancement, Inc.


View/download the 2018 program in PDF form here.

View our program from the 2015 Diversity Summit here.